Update on the latest news, sports, business and entertainment

LAX SHOOTING-CHARGES

Suspected LAX gunman charged

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Federal prosecutors have filed charges of murder and commission of violence at an international airport against the unemployed motorcycle mechanic suspected of carrying out the deadly shooting at the Los Angeles airport.

If convicted, Paul Ciancia (see-AHN'-see-uh) could get the death penalty. He was arrested Friday after authorities say he barged into a terminal, pulled an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle from his duffel bag and opened fire. A Transportation Security Administration officer was killed and several other people were injured, including two TSA officers, before Ciancia was shot by airport police.

U.S. Attorney Andre Birotte Jr. says the killing is "believed to be a premeditated act of murder in the first-degree."

Authorities believe someone dropped Ciancia off at the airport, and agents are reviewing surveillance tapes and other evidence to piece together the sequence of events.

According to authorities, the suspect appeared determined to lash out at the TSA, saying in a note that he wanted to kill at least one TSA officer and didn't care which one.

They say the suspect's note also mentioned "fiat currency" and "NWO," possible references to the New World Order, a conspiracy theory that foresees a totalitarian one-world government.

Ciancia, who was shot four times by airport police, remains hospitalized, but there's no word on his condition.

LAX SHOOTING-OFFICER SAFETY

TSA to review security after LAX shooting

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Transportation Security Administration will review its policy on officer safety in the wake of the deadly shooting at Los Angeles International Airport.

TSA Administrator John Pistole said Saturday that the agency's officers are "the first line of defense" in airport security. He said the agency would do everything possible to make sure Friday's tragedy was never repeated.

Pistole did not say if that meant arming officers. He spoke outside the home of slain TSA officer Gerardo Hernandez.

The 39-year-old Hernandez was fatally shot Friday when a gunman identified as Paul Ciancia entered LAX's Terminal 3 and began shooting. Five others, including two more TSA workers and the gunman, were injured.

Police say they found a note that indicated Ciancia targeted TSA officers.

LAX SHOOTING-TSA OFFICER

Slain LAX TSA officer remembered as a family man

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The 100-foot pylons at Los Angeles International Airport will be lit blue this weekend in honor of a transportation security officer who was killed in a shooting.

Authorities say 23-year-old Paul Ciancia strolled into Terminal 3 Friday, pulled a semi-automatic rifle from his duffel bag and started firing at Transportation Security Administration officers.

Gerardo I. Hernandez was fatally shot. He was the first TSA official in the agency's 12-year history to be killed in the line of duty.

Friend and former TSA co-worker Kevin Maxwell told KNBC-TV that Hernandez was a family man.

Maxwell says Hernandez was proud of his son, who played football.

TSA Administrator John Pistole met with Hernandez's family Saturday afternoon.

Fellow screeners and law enforcement officials are wearing black mourning bands in Hernandez's memory.

HEALTH OVERHAUL

Site repair: Hold that online health application

WASHINGTON (AP) — The application page of the troubled health insurance website is offline until Sunday morning.

The Health and Human Services Department says a technology team will be working on HealthCare.gov, so people won't be able to apply or enroll through the site.

That part of the site will be down from about 9 p.m. Saturday to about 9 a.m. Sunday.

The government says people can apply for coverage through the health marketplace call center — 1-800-318-2596. That's available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The federal website locked up the day it went live, Oct. 1, and has been cranky since. It's been taken down for maintenance before — usually for a few overnight hours.

The administration has said it's aiming to have HealthCare.gov humming along by month's end.

CLIMATE IMPACTS

Warming report sees violent, sicker, poorer future

WASHINGTON (AP) — A leaked draft of an international scientific report forecasts that man-made global warming likely will worsen already existing human tragedies of war, starvation, poverty, flooding, extreme weather and disease.

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will issue a report next March on how global warming is already affecting the way people live and what will happen in the future, including a worldwide drop in income. A leaked copy of a draft of the report's summary appeared online Friday. Governments will spend the next few months making comments about the draft.

The report details specific effects of warming and how countries and people can adapt to some of them. The American scientist who heads the report, Chris Field, says experts paint a dramatic contrast of possible futures.

SCHUMER-CLINTON

Sen. Chuck Schumer endorses Clinton for president

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York is urging his former Senate colleague, Hillary Rodham Clinton, to run for president. In fact, he's already endorsing her.

In remarks prepared for a Democratic Party dinner Saturday night in Des Moines, Iowa, the New York Democrat says that 2016, in his words, "is Hillary's time."

The former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state would be the leading contender for the Democratic nomination if she were to run. She told New York magazine in an article published in September that she was wrestling with whether to undertake another campaign.

Other potential Democratic presidential candidates include Vice President Joe Biden, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley.

Schumer is the Senate's third-ranking Democrat.

PAKISTAN

Pakistan slams US for killing Taliban leader

ISLAMABAD (AP) — The Pakistani government is accusing the U.S. of sabotaging peace talks with domestic Taliban fighters by killing their leader in a drone strike on Friday.

The slain Pakistani Taliban leader, Hakimullah Mehsud (hah-kee-MUH'-lah meh-SOOD'), was known for a deadly attack on a CIA base in Afghanistan and a bloody campaign that killed thousands of Pakistani civilians and security personnel.

The Pakistani army has launched numerous operations in the country's northwest in a failed attempt to subdue the group, which aims to topple Pakistan's democratic system and impose a harsh version of Islamic law.

Pakistan's government, which took office in June, has pushed peace talks with the Taliban as the best way to end the conflict, although many people are skeptical a deal is possible.

The drone strike that killed Mehsud in the North Waziristan tribal area came on Friday, a day before the government was to send a three-member delegation of clerics to the region with a formal invitation to start peace talks.

Pakistan's interior minister called the drone attack "murder" to the peace effort.

BREEDERS' CUP-VELAZQUEZ

Velazquez has spleen removed after track accident

ARCADIA, Calif. (AP) — Jockey John Velazquez was undergoing surgery to have his spleen removed hours after he was thrown from his horse in a race at the Breeders' Cup.

Velazquez's agent Angel Cordero Jr. told a Santa Anita spokesman by phone that the jockey was about to be released from a Pasadena hospital after he was thrown from Secret Compass and hit the track hard during Saturday's first Breeders' Cup race when doctors discovered internal bleeding.

Cordero says Velazquez was immediately taken to surgery for the spleen removal.

The 41-year-old New York-based jockey has won most of the nation's major stakes, including 13 Breeders' Cup races.

The filly, Secret Compass, was euthanized on the track after breaking her leg during the $2 million Juvenile Fillies.

GOETZ ARRESTED

NYC subway vigilante Goetz charged in drug case

NEW YORK (AP) — The subway vigilante who shot four panhandling youths on a New York City train in the 1980s is facing drug charges after allegedly selling marijuana to an undercover officer.

Bernhard Goetz was arraigned on misdemeanor drug charges Saturday in Manhattan Criminal Court.

The 65-year-old Goetz was released on his own recognizance and is due back in court next month. His lawyer couldn't immediately be reached for comment.

A criminal complaint says Goetz was arrested Friday evening in Union Square after giving an undercover police officer a napkin with loose marijuana in exchange for money.

The complaint says Goetz also had more pot in his pocket.

Goetz was cleared of attempted murder charges but convicted of weapons charges after the 1984 attack. He spent 250 days in jail.

BURNS-ROOSEVELT DOCUMENTARY

Burns explores Roosevelt legacy in new documentary

WARM SPRINGS, Ga. (AP) — Filmmaker Ken Burns says he wants to tell the story of the Roosevelts, both strengths and flaws, in his upcoming documentary on one of America's most famous political families.

Burns previewed parts of the 14-hour series Saturday during a Roosevelt family reunion on the grounds of the Georgia polio clinic purchased by President Franklin Roosevelt. The film airs next year and explores the history of Roosevelt, his wife, Eleanor, and President Theodore Roosevelt.

Burns said the Roosevelt political legacy remains relevant now as U.S. leaders debate how big the federal government should be.

The Roosevelts featured in the film lived and governed during a time of enormous change in the U.S, including the country's emergence as a world power, the Great Depression, World War II and the civil rights struggle.